Lawsuit reveals construction damage to the August Wilson Theatre; BC/EFA’s "Gypsy of the Year" fundraiser renamed the "Red Bucket Follies"; full cast announced for Roundabout "Kiss Me, Kate"; Bertie Carvel and Jonny Lee Miller to star in “Ink”; Alanis Morissette's "Jagged Little Pill" announces development lab; "The Preacher's Wife" musical likely headed to La Jolla; Rosie O'Donnell will co-star in a revival of "Funny Girl", but no Lady Gaga; Broadway community teams with March For Our Lives for a benefit concert on October 22nd; must read interview with Patti LuPone and NYT article about plays; RIP Ira Gasman and Carol Hall

REVIEW: Not your Aunt Eller’s “Oklahoma!”

Director Daniel Fish delivers a glorious and terrifying production of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s groundbreaking 1943 musical “Oklahoma!” at St. Ann’s Warehouse in Brooklyn, completely deconstructing this canonical and totemic masterpiece of American musical theatre by stripping it of its corn and highlighting the darker themes of violence and injustice that have always been simmering underneath.  Sexually charged and presented with a striking naturalism, this masterful new production is a revelation.

REVIEW: Heidi Schreck’s stunning and poignant “What the Constitution Means to Me”

Part civics lesson, part memoir—at once bittersweet and beautiful— Heidi Schreck’s mostly one-woman play “What the Constitution Means to Me” at  New York Theatre Workshop recounts her formative experience of wrestling with the constitution’s meaning as a teenager through the lens of her adult self, the women in her family, and the bitterly divided nation it serves.  Heartbreaking, humorous, brilliant, and profoundly important, this is a must-see event of the fall season.

Scott Rudin to produce "Hillary and Clinton" by Lucas Hnath starring Laurie Metcalf and John Lithgow; "Girl from the North Country" eyes the Walter Kerr Theatre; "TINA: The Tina Turner Musical" poised for Broadway in fall 2019; Dominique Morisseau named a MacArthur Foundation "Genius Grant" recipient; "Dear Evan Hansen" to open in London in fall 2019; "The Phantom of the Opera" to launch a new world tour in February; TKTS booths now display prices (vs. percentage discounts) at all locations; French singer Charles Aznavour dead at 94

Mike Birbiglia "The New One" books the Cort; "Kinky Boots" will close April 7th; Tony Goldwyn joins "Network"; "Almost Famous" musical and a musical about Jean-Michel Basquiat in the works; "Diana" musical books La Jolla Playhouse; Playwrights Horizons adopts GalaPro technology for deaf and hard-of-hearing patrons; “Head Over Heels" and! "Twelfth Night" cast albums coming; RIP Joe Masteroff, Merle Debuskey, and Roger Robinson

REVIEW: “The Nap”—prepare to be snookered

Manhattan Theatre Club presents Richard Bean’s hilarious new comedy, “The Nap”, a high-stakes, low-rent farce set in the world of Snooker (British pool).  A superbly comical, poised, and perfectly cast ensemble of kooky characters make this off-beat crime thriller comedy the kind of delightfully droll escape that only theatre can provide.  Silly, yes, but that’s never been more needed than right now.

REVIEW: “Bernhardt/Hamlet”—bold and incoherent

Theresa Rebeck’s “Bernhardt/Hamlet” is a backstage comedy-drama of historical fiction recounting Sarah Bernhardt’s groundbreaking 1897 turn as Hamlet in Paris; discursive, incoherent, and verbose, the play has nothing particularly interesting to say about gender politics as it ambitiously attempts to tackle a panoply of themes and ideas.  I’d much rather see Ms. McTeer play Hamlet than watch an endless series of rehearsals.

REVIEW: WWI Through the Eyes of a Young Soldier in “Private Peaceful”

In “Private Peaceful”, Irish actor Shane O’Regan makes a smashing New York debut playing 24 characters in a one-man World War I story.  A dispatch from the trenches of war told from the perspective of a young solider, this simple but arresting play is a haunting reminder of the savage cost of war and the terrific sacrifices made for democracy by those who came before us.  I recommend you catch this crisp and brilliant production before it goes on tour.  

Roundabout announces a starry revival of "All My Sons"; plans announced for the Times Square Theatre and the Palace Theatre; Brandon Uranowitz joining "The Band's Visit"; Judy Kaye joining "Anastasia"; New Victory Theatre will produce a stage play adaptation of "Where the Wild Things Are"; "Hundred Days" and "Pretty Woman" cast albums released; features on the puppetry behind "King Kong", costume designers, and the top produced plays and playwrights; trailblazing African American dancer and founder of the Dance Theater of Harlem Arthur Mitchell is dead at 84

REVIEW: Edie Falco in “The True”

In “The True”, playwright Sharr White dramatizes the 1977 Albany Mayoral primary election from a domestic, interpersonal perspective.  Edie Falco is fiercely magnetic as real life, foul-mouthed political operative Polly Noonan, but the play itself is rarely compelling and suffers from sedentary staging and unrealistic expository conversations that explain complex—and fundamentally uninteresting—political dynamics.

REVIEW: “The Revolving Cycles Truly and Steadily Roll’d”

“The Revolving Cycles Truly and Steadily Roll’d” makes its imprint in explicitly displaying the tragedy of its titular “revolving cycles” of racism and indifference, and by viscerally depriving the audience of any disconnection between the world of the stage and the world of our lives.  With terrific performances throughout, and trenchant treatment of a devastating story and situation, metatheatrical devices cloud its impact, which can be too clinical, but is nevertheless striking.